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Entries tagged with “Ted Wendel”.


Annlee Burch, Ed.D., M.P.H., PT, ASHS physical therapy chair and associate professor, hoods a doctor of physical therapy candidate .

Annlee Burch, Ed.D., M.P.H., PT, ASHS physical therapy chair and associate professor, hoods a doctor of physical therapy candidate .

MESA, Ariz. (Mar. 12, 2009) – A.T. Still University’s Arizona School of Health Sciences (ATSU-ASHS) celebrated commencement ceremonies for four online programs Saturday, March 7 at 10 a.m. at the Phoenix Convention Center.

A total of 292 graduates earned either master of science or doctoral degrees in ASHS’ Human Movement, Physician Assistant Studies, Audiology, and Physical Therapy programs. “Once again, it was exciting to watch health professionals attain a higher degree with the intention of making a difference in the care of their patients,” said ASHS Dean Randy Danielsen, Ph.D., PA-C, DFAAPA.

“Phoenix should be very proud of hosting this event,” said ATSU Provost Craig M. Phelps, D.O., FAOASM. “Graduates and their families from across the country gathered at a wonderful venue, on a beautiful Arizona day to celebrate their achievement.”

Founded in 1995, ASHS is committed to educating and preparing its students to practice at the forefront of a rapidly growing healthcare system. “Graduation is a wonderful opportunity to both celebrate the accomplishments of our students and recognize their much-needed contribution to healthcare throughout the community and the nation,” said ATSU Associate Provost O.T. Wendel, Ph.D.

As part of the commencement ceremony, an honorary doctor of humane letters degree of was awarded to keynote speaker William Kohlhepp, D.H.Sc., PA-C. Dr. Kohlhepp is associate professor of physician assistant education at the Quinnipiac University PA program in Hamden, Conn., and practices part-time in New Haven, Conn.

Dr. Kohlhepp encouraged graduates to embrace their professional values throughout their careers by focusing on patients, other health professionals, the public, and themselves. “Your time at ATSU has likely immersed you in the mission of the University which includes a number of professionalism values, so you may be well on your way,” he said. “The work you will be doing will be challenging and rewarding. You will save lives, you will heal bodies and minds; you will touch hearts. You will make a difference.”

Dr. Kohlhepp has published numerous articles on clinical and professional topics. He served on the board of directors of the National Commission on the Certification of Physician Assistants, serving as chair in 2006. He is past president of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, a distinguished fellow of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), and was recently recognized as PA of the Year by the AAPA.

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Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D.

Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D.

MESA, Ariz. (Nov. 21, 2008 ) – Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D., noted scientist, author, and stroke survivor, joined A.T. Still University (ATSU) to keynote a luncheon celebrating the launch of ATSU’s Women’s Wellness Program Nov. 18 at the Hilton Scottsdale Resort and Villas. Dr. Taylor, who was recently named one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World, shared her personal story of survival, recovery, and discovery during her presentation entitled “How to Get Your Brain to Do What You Want it to Do.”

Dr. Taylor, a Harvard-educated neuroanatomist, had a rare form of stroke 12 years ago which caused a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain. It took eight years for Dr. Taylor to successfully rebuild her brain following the stroke, and she shares her story in her book “My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey.”

Dr. Taylor’s message of compassion during the healing process resonated deeply with an audience of ATSU friends, faculty, and staff who support a university mission that focuses on compassion, integrity, and ability. “Dr. Taylor inspired our students and faculty to look beyond a patient’s illness or injury and connect with their humanity through compassion and understanding,” said ATSU Provost Craig M. Phelps, D.O., FAOASM. “She was inspired to see development of compassion in our students, faculty and staff as a major component of ATSU’s mission statement.”

ATSU Associate Provost Ted Wendel, Ph.D. was in agreement. “Dr. Taylor’sexperienceand knowledge brought reality to the words of the ATSU mission,” he said.

Close to 150 were in attendance at the luncheon that was also the launch of ATSU’s new Women’s Wellness Program. The program was founded to provide educational opportunities to the public as well as develop a collective of women focused on improving the quality of their lives and the lives of those around them.

According to Dr. Phelps, the Women’s Wellness Program is an important component in the university’s overall community outreach efforts. “As a leading edge university with a school of osteopathic medicine, it is imperative that we be involved in community wellness,” he said.

“For many years, women went unrecognized as important decision-makers in how families accessed healthcare,” he continued. “[This program] will provide information to key household stakeholders who often make healthcare decisions for immediate family, extended family, and sometimes the entire community.”

For more information about ATSU’s Women’s Wellness Program, please contact Gretchen Buhlig at 480.219.6105 or gbuhlig@astu.edu.

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