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Entries tagged with “Corporation for National and Community Service”.


Honor Roll

ATSU is named to the President's Honor Roll with distinction.

KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – A.T. Still University (ATSU) has been named to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

The Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers the annual Honor Roll award, recognizes colleges and universities for their impact on issues from poverty and homelessness to environmental justice. On campuses across the country, thousands of students joined their faculty to develop innovative programs and projects to meet local needs using the skills gained in their classrooms.

“Congratulations to A.T. Still University and its students for their dedication to service and commitment to improving their local communities,” said Patrick Corvington, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Our nation’s students are a critical part of the equation and vital to our efforts to tackle the most persistent challenges we face.”

ATSU was named to the Honor Roll based on a series of selection factors including the scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses.

In 2009, nearly 60 percent of ATSU’s student body spent more than 13,000 volunteer hours serving the University’s local communities near its two campuses in Kirksville, Mo., and Mesa, Ariz.

Students and faculty at ATSU’s Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine organized and participated in outreach projects including the Court Appointed Special Advocacy program, which advocates for abused and neglected children in the justice system. The program has been so successful that it has recently moved into adjacent counties to serve even more at-risk youth.

At ATSU’s Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ASDOH), the Give Kids a Smile® project provided free dental care to local underserved children. At the one-day event, more than 200 children received care with the cost of the donated treatment totaling more than $100,000.

ASDOH students and faculty also participated in the Special Smiles project, during which they provided oral health screenings, referrals, and education for Special Olympic athletes; the American Indian Oral Health & Dental Career Outreach project where they educated American Indian high school students about oral health and careers in dentistry; and the Project Challenge Oral Health & Drug Prevention program where they worked with troubled teens to raise awareness about methamphetamines’ effect on oral health and other issues relating to teenage oral health.

At ATSU’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, students and faculty provided full physical exams to underserved Hispanic children and adults.

“I am proud of our students, faculty, and staff who always come together in a common cause and contribute generously and often to serve the needs of others,” said ATSU President Jack Magruder.

The University partners with numerous organizations that support student community service activities. These organizations include local elementary schools, state universities, hospitals, Women Infant Children centers, Head Start centers, Special Olympics, Arizona Coalition for Tomorrow, county health departments, community centers, community health centers, senior centers, and nursing homes.

College students make a significant contribution to the volunteer sector; in 2009, 3.16 million students performed more than 300 million hours of service, according to the Volunteering in America study released by the Corporation. Each year, the Corporation invests more than $150 million in fostering a culture of service on college campuses through grants awarded by its programs; the education awards that AmeriCorps members receive at the conclusion of their term of service to pay for college; and through support of training, research, recognition, and other initiatives to spur college service.

The Corporation oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact and the American Council on Education.

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The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages more five million Americans in service through its Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, and leads President Obama’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit www.nationalservice.gov.

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KIRKSVILLE, Mo. (3/5/09) – The Corporation for National and Community Service honored A.T. Still University (ATSU) with a place on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for exemplary service efforts and service to America’s communities.  

“This wonderful award is very meaningful to our students and faculty, who practice every day what our mission promises: to educate healthcare professionals who continuously develop and demonstrate compassion,” said ATSU President Jack Magruder, Ed.D. “Serving the community is a natural and fundamental part of what we do here, and it is extremely gratifying to receive this honor.”

Launched in 2006, the Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses.

During 2008, ATSU students and faculty members provided nearly 4,000 hours of community service on both ATSU’s Missouri and Arizona campuses. The Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM) in particular has one service-learning elective course where 45 students served as court appointed special advocates, serving 60 children in the CASA program.

“In this time of economic distress, we need volunteers more than ever. College students represent an enormous pool of idealism and energy to help tackle some of our toughest challenges,” said Stephen Goldsmith, vice chair of the Board of Directors of the Corporation for National and Community Service, which oversees the Honor Roll. “We salute KCOM for making community service a campus priority, and thank the millions of college students who are helping to renew America through service to others.”

Overall, the Corporation honored only six schools with Presidential Awards. In addition, 83 were named as Honor Roll With Distinction members and 546 schools as Honor Roll members. In total, 635 schools were recognized. A full list is available at www.nationalservice.gov/honorroll.

The Honor Roll is a program of the Corporation, in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation. The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is presented during the annual conference of the American Council on Education. 

“I offer heartfelt congratulations to those institutions named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. College and university students across the country are making a difference in the lives of others every day – as are the institutions that encourage their students to serve others,” said American Council on Education President Molly Corbett Broad.

Recent studies have underlined the importance of service-learning and volunteering to college students. In 2006, 2.8 million college students gave more than 297 million hours of volunteer service, according to the Corporation’s Volunteering in America 2007 study. Expanding campus incentives for service is part of a larger initiative to spur higher levels of volunteering by America’s college students. The Corporation is working with a coalition of federal agencies, higher education and student associations, and nonprofit organizations to achieve this goal.

The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. The Corporation administers Senior Corps, AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America, a program that supports service-learning in schools, institutions of higher education and community-based organizations. For more information, visit www.nationalservice.gov.

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Kirksville, Mo. (Apr. 18, 2008 ) – The Corporation for National and Community Service named A.T. Still University to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for exemplary service efforts and service to disadvantaged youth. 

Launched in 2006, the Community Service Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. Honorees for the award were chosen based on a series of selection factors including scope and innovativeness of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses.

“College students are tackling the toughest problems in America, demonstrating their compassion, commitment, and creativity in by serving as mentors, tutors, health workers, and even engineers,” Eisner said. “They represent a renewed spirit of civic engagement fostered by outstanding leadership on caring campuses.”

The Honor Roll is jointly sponsored by the Corporation, through its Learn and Serve America program, and the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, USA Freedom Corps, and the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation.

In congratulating the winners, U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said, “Americans rely on our higher education system to prepare students for citizenship and the workforce. We look to institutions like these to provide leadership in partnering with local schools to shape the civic, democratic and economic future of our country.”

Overall, the Community Service Honor Roll awarded six schools with Presidential Awards.  In addition, four schools were recognized as Special Achievement Award winners, 127 as Honor Roll With Distinction members and 391 schools as Honor Roll members.  In total, 528 schools were recognized.  A full list is available at www.nationalservice.gov/honorroll.

“There is no question that the universities and colleges who have made an effort to participate and win the Honor Roll award are themselves being rewarded,” said American Council on Education President David Ward.  “Earning this distinction is not easy.  But now each of these schools will be able to wear this award like a badge of honor.”

The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. The Corporation administers Senior Corps, AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America, a program that supports service-learning in schools, institutions of higher education and community-based organizations. For more information, go to http://www.nationalservice.gov.

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