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Entries tagged with “Andrew Taylor Still”.


IMLSKIRKSVILLE, Mo. – The Still National Osteopathic Museum and the A.T. Still Memorial Library received its second Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant in two years. The $30,577 grant will primarily be used to provide digitalized historic materials online that follow the growth of the founding institution of osteopathic medicine and additional papers of Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., D.O., the founder of osteopathy.

These handwritten papers document the early development of the osteopathic medical profession in rural northeast Missouri. Dr. Still (1828-1917) founded the American School of Osteopathy in 1892 in Kirksville (now A.T. Still University, a health sciences university comprised of five schools), significantly advancing healthcare beyond the standard American medical practice of his day. The digitalization project expands access to this historic collection by significantly increasing the services provided to academic scholars, physicians, researchers, students, the public, and libraries throughout Missouri and the far reaches of the Internet.

In January 2009, the museum and library received its first $38,761 LSTA grant to begin the transcription and digitalization process of Dr. Still’s personal and professional writings, many of which were unpublished at the time. According to Debra Loguda-Summers, museum curator and project director, more than 700 pages of Dr. Still’s documents were made available online at the Missouri Digital Heritage website, sponsored by Missouri State Archives and Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

The museum’s most recent grant begins February 1. “The next stage of our work on this grant will cover the early growth and administration of the founding school in Kirksville,” said Museum Director Jason Haxton. “We will use the earliest board minutes, legal documents, and letters surrounding our university’s growth from a two-room school house into a national academic institution.”

This phase of the project is expected to take a year to complete and is supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the Missouri State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State.

The Still National Osteopathic Museum collects, preserves, and makes available artifacts and related materials to communicate the history and philosophy of osteopathic medicine to a global audience. The museum is headquartered on A.T. Still University’s Missouri Campus in Kirksville and is the only museum dedicated to the national history of osteopathic medicine.

The A.T. Still Memorial Library includes more than 80,000 volumes and more than 4,500 audiovisual items supporting education in the clinical and basic sciences at A.T. Still University. The library also serves the general public.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. The Institute’s mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas.

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MESA, Ariz. – At a time when healthcare reform will most likely propose wellness incentives and taking personal responsibility for health, A.T. Still University (ATSU) has already been leading the way in both its curriculum for medical school students and its employee health program.

ATSU’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (ATSU-SOMA) is grounded in osteopathic medicine, which focuses on wellness, prevention, and the integration of mind, body, and spirit. Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., D.O., is the father of osteopathic medicine and founder of the first college of osteopathic medicine, now A.T. Still University-Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (ATSU-KCOM).

SOMA’s four-year curriculum includes clinical experience in patient settings beginning in the first year. As a reflection of osteopathic philosophy, the curriculum emphasizes preventive medicine and comprehensive patient care. Most medical schools do not enter clinical training until their third year, following two years of basic sciences and clinical text studies. SOMA students are unique in that they continue basic science and clinical curriculum studies while interacting with patients in community health centers (CHCs) throughout the United States.

“Our students work alongside CHC faculty and are able to diagnose, treat, and educate patients on disease and disease prevention,” said Douglas Wood, D.O., Ph.D., dean of SOMA. “We believe that we are the right medical school at the right time. Healthcare reform is now focusing on prevention and individuals at risk for chronic diseases, but prevention and wellness always have been our focus, and we are preparing tomorrow’s healthcare providers to advocate personal health responsibility and prevention. We are also serving a population of individuals who may be medically uninsured or underinsured.”

In addition, CHCs offer students the opportunity to learn about and participate in disease collaboratives. The National Center for Disease Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion put together collaboratives for treating chronic diseases such as diabetes and asthma. The collaboratives—so named because CHCs nationwide participate in the protocols—are proving to be cost-effective and show a reduction in the frequency of hospital visits for patients with these chronic diseases. The collaboratives also allow outreach to populations who may be disproportionately affected by these diseases.

ATSU focuses on wellness and prevention among their employees as well. ATSU offers employees a chance to take personal responsibility for their health while also receiving a discount on their health insurance premium through the Still Healthy program. Still Healthy not only comprises a reduction in monthly premiums, but employees are also eligible for an annual reimbursement for participating in the program. All employees agree to attend four educational health programs per year, complete an online health assessment, and be a non-smoker or participate in a smoking cessation program. Additionally, all participants agree to a wellness exam paid 100 percent by ATSU.

“We understand that healthcare reform will probably advocate personal responsibility for being healthy, and we are already implementing wellness incentives for our employees to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors,” said Tonya Watson, assistant director, human resources at ATSU in Arizona.

The recent addition of the East Valley Family YMCA on ATSU’s Arizona campus provides students, staff, and faculty with an added opportunity to focus on disease prevention and wellness. The YMCA opened October 24 and will partner with ATSU on programs that improve the health of ATSU employees and YMCA members.

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KIRKSVILLE, Mo. (2-12-09) – It’s time to submit nominations for A.T. Still University’s annual Still Spirit Awards. Nominees are individuals within our community – young and old alike – who give unselfishly of their time and talent to make a difference in the lives of others. They are role models who advance community well-being through professional, personal, and service affiliations. They are people of action who recognize obstacles, yet find opportunities. They are innovative, creative, and passionate do-ers. They are teachers, service men or women, community volunteers, members of service clubs, youth in our community, senior citizens …just to name a few. They deserve your recognition through A.T. Still University’s Still Spirit Awards.

Everyone is invited to nominate members of our community who best personify the compassion, integrity, and spirit of ATSU’s founder, Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., D.O., and who help our community grow and prosper through exemplary leadership and the spirit of volunteerism.

Submit nominations at www.atsu.edu/spirit. All nominations must be accompanied by a statement of support for nominees describing the significance of their role and their impact within our community. The selection committee evaluates and selects recipients based on examples and details provided in each statement of support. Four recipients are selected from submitted nominations. ATSU employees and prior Still Spirit Award recipients are not eligible for nomination. The nomination deadline is 5 p.m. on Monday, March 2, 2009.

The Still Spirit Awards Dinner & Ceremony will be held Wednesday, April 1, 2009, at Truman State University’s Georgian Room, located in the Student Union Building from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend this special event. The cost to attend is $20 per person or $35 per couple. RSVPs are requested.

For questions pertaining to nominations or to RSVP for the 2009 Still Spirit Awards Dinner & Ceremony, contact Virginia Halterman, ATSU Communications & Marketing, at 660.626.2544 or vhalterman@atsu.edu.

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