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Still Research Institute


KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – The Museum of Osteopathic MedicineSM and the A.T. Still Research Institute (SRI) at A.T. Still University have been awarded $7,200 for “The Legacy Project.” The purpose of the project is to systematically capture video recordings and stories from osteopathic physicians and researchers whose careers significantly impacted the osteopathic profession through their leadership, clinical skill, teaching, mentorship, and research.

In 2011, the Cranial Academy Foundation awarded a $10,000 grant to the museum and SRI to preserve the stories, documents, and other meaningful information regarding the work of Viola M. Frymann, DO, FCA, FAAO.

“This additional grant from the Osteopathic Cranial Academy Foundation will help further our goal of collecting the history of those osteopathic physicians and researchers who have enriched the future of osteopathy,” said Debra Loguda-Summers, project director.

“I am saddened to learn that one or more great osteopaths have passed away each month. These dedicated professionals have contributed to the science of osteopathic medicine while helping those who suffer. The goal of ‘The Legacy Project ’is to preserve the knowledge, skill and history of these amazing healthcare leaders and healers for future generations.” said Jason Haxton, MA, museum director.

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KIRKSVILLE, Mo.- The Museum of Osteopathic MedicineSM and A.T. Still Research Institute at A.T. Still University have received the Advocates for the American Osteopathic Association (AAOA) Special Project’s Grant.

The Museum of Osteopathic MedicineSM and the A.T. Still Research Institute (SRI) were awarded $2,000 for “The Legacy Project,” who purpose to systematically capture video-recordings and stories from osteopathic physicians and researchers whose careers significantly impacted the osteopathic profession through their leadership, clinical skill, teaching, mentorship, and research.

In 2011, the Cranial Academy Foundation awarded a $10,000 grant to the museum and SRI to preserve the stories, documents, and other meaningful information regarding the work of Dr. Viola M. Frymann.

In early October, at the American Osteopathic Association’s annual conference in San Diego, Jason Haxton, museum director, met with three of the AAOA grant selection committee members. He was informed the museum’s work in preserving the history of the profession was unmatched, and it was with pride they supported the museum’s projects – this being the fifth grant the museum received from the AAOA.

“This grant from the AAOA Special Project committee will help further along our goal of collecting the history of those osteopathic physicians and researchers who have enriched the future of osteopathy,” says Debra Loguda-Summers, project director.

The AAOA Special Projects Committee awarded $12,000 to 12 different projects this year that aimed to support the osteopathic profession – the museum received the highest funding level.

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Deshala Castille, OMS II

KIRKSVILLE,Mo. – More than 80 students, faculty, professionals, and guests gathered in the Connell Information Technologies Center on October 22 for the 3rd annual Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Symposium. The event, sponsored by the Still Research Institute, gave local researchers and their students the opportunity to present current research activity and promote a foundation for collaborative biomedical research between A.T. Still University (ATSU) and Truman State University.

“The purpose of this event is to expand and support the research culture at both campuses,” said Neil Sargentini, Ph.D., microbiology/immunology chair at ATSU’s Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine and chair of the symposium program committee. “Our goals are to identify new areas of biomedical research that potentially will lead to advances in total person healthcare and wellness and to identify local resources and opportunities for research.”

In total, 24 different research projects were presented. The keynote address was delivered by Thomas Graven-Nielsen, dr.med.sci., Ph.D., head of the Doctoral School in Medicine & Biomedical Technology and deputy head of the Department of Health Science & Technology at Aalborg University in Aalborg, Denmark.

“By partnering with other educational institutions such as Truman State University and providing a platform at a public event, we encourage researchers to present their research and to talk about research interests and resources,” Dr. Degenhardt said. “All of the research presented has the potential to answer questions that will affect future healthcare.”

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Students enjoy participating in the ATSU's annual 5K run/1 mile walk on October 17

Students enjoy participating in the ATSU's annual 5K run/1 mile walk on October 17

KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – Faculty, staff, students, alumni, family, and friends joined in celebration of A.T. Still University’s (ATSU) annual Founder’s Day Celebration, held October 15-17.

Festivities included the inaugural Tinning Founder’s Day Osteopathy lecture presented by Edward G. Stiles, D.O. “I was overwhelmed when I was selected to give this lecture,” Dr. Stiles said. “I enjoy teaching and have had a ball in my career. I hope the same for these students.”

President Jack Magruder led the annual graveside ceremony honoring University founder A.T. Still, M.D., D.O. The first memorial ceremony took place December 2, 1919, and each year a wreath is placed on his grave. “(Still was) humble, intellectual, and spiritual in his thinking. He had an honest desire and the competence to treat people and alleviate pain and suffering,” Magruder said. “He gave all he had, all the time. And people loved him for it.”

ATSU Board of Trustees Chair Pete Detweiler and President Magruder kicked off the all-campus meeting by discussing the University’s financial stability and growth during the economic downturn.

Associate Vice President of Admissions and Alumni Services Lori Haxton, M.A., recognized alumni from the classes of 1984 and 1959, awarding gold medallions and pins for 50th anniversary honorees.

School of Health Management (SHM) Interim Dean Kimberly O’Reilly, D.H.Ed., M.S.W., discussed SHM’s past, talked about the present, and outlined the future. She hopes to further develop SHM’s partnership with the A.T. Still Research Institute, is looking forward to other joint initiatives within the university, and moving each program within SHM toward further accreditation.

Closing out the meeting, Dean Philip Slocum, D.O., recognized Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM) students and staff for their accomplishments, including the outstanding devotion KCOM students give towards community service. In the past year, students have given more than 1,000 volunteer hours to the City of Kirksville.

ATSU and the Still National Osteopathic Museum unveiled the Dr. Thomas Quinn, D.O., Reading Room, research center, and new artifact storage area. This marks the third museum move due to growth of the collection and helps to consolidate facilities for researchers and staff duties. Dr. Jamie Archer, Brit. Osteopath, of Ulna, England, signed over the first artifact to the museum’s new collection space— a hand built useable replica of Dr. Still’s treatment chair designed in the 1900s. Dr. Archer built two of the artifacts using Dr. Still’s notes, photographs, and references by significant D.O.s of the time. These are the only two devices known in existence. Dr. Archer later demonstrated the chairs use at the continuing medical education program on Saturday.

Friday night was filled with food and fun at Still-A-Bration 2009, where faculty, students, staff, family, and friends enjoyed games, food and dancing.

The annual 5K run/1 mile walk on Saturday capped the weekend’s festivities with more than 60 participants. Second-year KCOM student Tyler Hill took home the men’s 5K title with a time of 16:36. First-year student Cara Lucas led the women with a time of 23:48.

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Two universities collaborate on inaugural research symposium

KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – In an exciting new collaboration, the A.T. Still Research Institute (SRI) at A.T. Still University (ATSU) has partnered with Truman State University in Kirksville, MO., to host the first Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Symposium. The symposium, to be held from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., September 26, at ATSU’s Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM), will set the foundation for more interdisciplinary biomedical research between the ATSU and Truman campuses and beyond.

“The purpose of this event is to expand and support the research culture at both campuses,” said Neil Sargentini, Ph.D., microbiology/immunology chair at KCOM and chair of the symposium program committee. “Our goals are to identify new areas of biomedical research that potentially will lead to advances in total person healthcare and wellness and to identify local resources and opportunities for research.”

Symposium agenda

A full schedule of activities is slated for the symposium, including oral and poster presentations on research resources and accomplishments by ATSU and Truman faculty and students; panel discussions on human research, animal models, and student research opportunities; and a keynote presentation by President and CEO of Health Sciences South Carolina Jay Moskowitz, Ph.D.

Dr. Moskowitz will bring his vast experience in working through federal, state, and foundation systems to develop programs that facilitate research programs and careers of emerging basic science and physician investigators. He has served as a member of SRI’s External Board of Scientific Counselors since SRI’s inception in 2001.

“Because of his experience, Dr. Moskowitz will be able to present insightful information on how to link independent campus research and research groups into a collaborative research network,” said Brian Degenhardt, D.O., SRI director and assistant vice president for osteopathic research. “He will present the challenges and barriers that he has experienced in establishing research programs and what resolutions were developed to overcome these challenges.”

Biomedical research

Research topics to be covered at the symposium include a combination of observational, clinical, and mechanistic studies. These areas of focus were specifically chosen because they are strategic areas of research for SRI, are consistent with areas of research routinely supported at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and are fundamental to the scientific process.

“Observational studies, a subset of clinical studies, provide evidence to support broader, more rigorous and expensive prospective, randomized, and double blinded studies,” explained Dr. Degenhardt. “Clinical studies tend to have the greatest relevance for the practice of medicine although they can be more challenging to perform than research on animals. Mechanistic studies are necessary to advance the understanding of the physiologic mechanisms underlying the effects seen in clinical studies.”

Faculty and student researchers will present topics from these three areas at the symposium.

Importance of collaboration

Planning for the inaugural symposium began more than a year ago by a committee consisting of representatives from Truman, ATSU, and SRI. Facilitating a strong research environment is a priority at ATSU, particularly in areas that promote osteopathic principles, study the aging process, and that help people live healthier, longer lives.

“Both universities take this common goal seriously,” said Dr. Degenhardt. “This conference is intended to facilitate each campus’ research activity by identifying common areas of interest between professors with different yet complementary skill sets particularly in areas that have the potential of influencing future medical care.

“By partnering with other educational institutions such as Truman State University and providing a platform at a public event, we encourage researchers to present their research and to talk about research interests and resources,” he said.

The NIH has also recently made interdisciplinary research a priority. “Collaborative, interdisciplinary research expands the view of a single discipline to a broader, potentially more holistic view of the questions being asked within the scientific field,” said Dr. Sargentini. “Outcomes from this type of research should better support healthcare that is consistent with osteopathic principles.”

Looking to the future

The program committee anticipates establishing the symposium as an annual event to include both ATSU’s Missouri and Arizona campuses as well as Truman State University. So far, the committee has received interest from new and active faculty and student researchers.

“There is also the possibility, in a few years, of expanding the event to target a national researcher audience,” said Dr. Degenhardt. This means continuing to include other research institutions in the collaborative process.

To learn more about the symposium, visit www.atsu.edu/research/conferences_seminars.

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