header

2009


KIRKLAND, WA (Oct. 26, 2009) – A.T. Still University (ATSU) ranked #6 out of 200 educational institutions offering online degree programs by Guide to Online Schools, a leading online education portal. The annual study by Guide to Online Schools factored in multiple metrics: regional accreditation, tuition cost, number of students, number of full-time faculty, number of part-time faculty, student-to-faculty ratio, graduation rate, and retention rate, all derived from the latest data compiled by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a U.S. Department of Education group. For its findings, Guide to Online Schools also leveraged student feedback and reviews collected on its site during the study. The top 25 schools to rank were then published with full metric data presented online.

ATSU had the highest graduation rate of all the top 25 institutions and ranked well for having a low overall student-to-faculty ratio. ATSU received high marks for its accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCACS), in addition to having program-specific accreditations through professional organizations. For example, the University’s Physician Assistant Studies program is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).

ATSU’s ranking placed it ahead of other popular online institutions, including the University of Phoenix, Capella University, and Walden University. “A.T. Still University has consistently proven itself to be a leading institution, both in terms of popularity and in the quality of education it provides its students. The University represents a fantastic distance learning opportunity for anyone interested in furthering their healthcare education,” stated Keith Cushner, project manager for Guide to Online Schools.

ATSU, with residential campuses in Kirksville, Mo., and Mesa, Ariz., was founded in 1892. The University offers graduate degree programs centered on whole person healthcare and other related healthcare fields, delivering courses through a variety of methods, including campus-based, blended learning, and online.

Guide to Online Schools in an authoritative online resource for distance education and career information. The site provides prospective students with school reviews, distance learning testimonials, in-depth career information, and the ability to connect directly with schools. Guide to Online School’s study is available at http://www.guidetoonlineschools.com/online-colleges, and is part of an annual review of all online schools presented on the website.

For more information, contact Keith Cushner of Guide to Online Schools at 425.605.8898 or keith@reachnetwork.com.

Share

Contact Communications & Marketing for more information.

MESA, Ariz. – Researchers at A.T. Still University (ATSU) in Mesa, Ariz., and SouthWest Advanced Neurological Rehabilitation (SWAN Rehab) in Phoenix are challenging old assumptions about stroke rehabilitation with a new, intensive therapy program for chronic stroke survivors. ATSU-Arizona School of Health Sciences faculty Pamela Bosch, PT, Ph.D., and James Lynskey, PT, Ph.D., together with Kay Wing, PT, D.P.T., NCS, GCS, at SWAN Rehab have teamed up with colleagues to test the new program, which consists of a four-week, intensive, whole body therapy.

Millions of stroke survivors are left with social, motor, and/or mobility deficits, resulting in a reduced ability to perform typical activities of daily living and, ultimately, a diminished quality of life. The intensive approach being tested is based on current principles of neuroplasticity and a vast body of research showing that the brain can be trained to re-organize after injury and re-learn to do things previously done by the damaged area of the brain even years after stroke.

According to Dr. Bosch, a gap exists between this research and the current status of neurorehabilitation in clinical practice. “In spite of the compelling research showing functional recovery after stroke, both acute and chronic, conventional rehabilitation programs have often continued using a traditional model of service delivery,” she said.

Traditional stroke therapy includes in-patient rehabilitation for a few weeks to a month, transitioning to an out-patient program for a few additional weeks. This includes a few hours of therapy per week, limited to a few months after a stroke. In contrast, the new, more intensive treatment being tested involves daily therapy sessions of three hours per day, four days per week for four weeks.

The therapy sessions take place at SWAN Rehab, located in Central Phoenix. SWAN and ATSU have been conducting this study for a year and are currently enrolling participants. The study also includes an education-only group for comparison. The education-only group will not receive the intensive therapy but will be instructed on an individualized exercise program based on the patient’s goals and education on the benefits of remaining active after a stroke.

For more information about the intensive stroke pilot program, call SWAN Rehab at 602.393.0520, or ATSU at 480.219.6063.

Share

Contact Communications & Marketing for more information.
Geoffrey Hoffa, PA-C

Geoffrey Hoffa, PA-C

MESA, Ariz. – A.T. Still University-Arizona School of Health Sciences (ATSU-ASHS) alumnus Geoffrey Hoffa, PA-C, was recently named to the Arizona Regulatory Board of Physician Assistants (ARBoPA) by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer. He will replace Randy Danielsen, Ph.D., PA-C, dean of ATSU-ASHS, who has just completed his maximum two terms on the board.

“When completing a term on an important regulatory board, it is always great to see younger, energetic people come forward,” said Dr. Danielsen. “In this case I am even more thrilled to see an ATSU-ASHS PA alumnus of Mr. Hoffa’s caliber appointed to this prestigious board by Governor Brewer.”

Hoffa, a ’00 graduate of ATSU-ASHS, was appointed to the board on October 9, and will attend his first quarterly meeting on November 18. While serving on the ARBoPA board, which licenses and regulates more than 1,000 Arizona physician assistants (PA), his job will be to ensure public safety through adherence to practice laws and rules. He also sees it as an opportunity to serve the public by helping to attract much-needed healthcare professionals to Arizona through modern, forward-thinking healthcare practice rules that will benefit the physician/PA partnership.

“I am currently pursuing efforts at broadening my contacts locally and around the nation to seize the opportunity which has presented itself in the current healthcare debate,” said Hoffa. “As a leader and consultant, I will persist to push the profession forward, as well as continue to expand my role as a community leader. I believe the two efforts share the common goal of ensuring quality, affordable healthcare.”

After graduating from ATSU-ASHS, Hoffa worked in solid organ transplant for over five years at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix. He started his own independent contracting business, Hoffa Health Care, in 2008, and continues to hold leadership positions with the Arizona State Association of Physician Assistants, lobbying and serving as a delegate at the national level.

Share

Contact Communications & Marketing for more information.
President Magruder and new board member Ron Winkler

President Magruder and new board member Ron Winkler

KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – The A.T. Still University (ATSU) Board of Trustees met October 17 in Kirksville, Mo., during Founder’s Day weekend for its quarterly meeting and elected its newest member, Ronald Winkler of Kirksville. Winkler is president of Winkler Communication Services, a telephone and fiber cable installation and repair company that has served northeast Missouri since 1991. Winkler will serve a three-year term. The board now has 17 members.

The board also made a number of other personnel changes, including saying goodbye to former chair Peter Detweiler, CEO of Alliant Bank in Kirksville, whose term expired, and re-electing members Cynthia Byler, D.O., of St. Louis, Mo.; Carl Bynum, D.O., M.P.H., of Warson Woods, Mo.; Manuel Bedoya, D.M.D., of Tucson, Ariz.; Clyde Evans, Ph.D., of Needham, Mass.; and John Robinson, of Phoenix, Ariz.

New officers were also appointed: Dr. Bynum as chair; Kenneth Jones, D.O., of Clinton, Mo., as vice chair; Dr. Byler as secretary; Robert Uhl, of Phoenix, Ariz., as finance committee chair; and Dr. Evans as chair of the education/research committee.

The next board meeting is scheduled for February 2010 in Mesa, Ariz.

Share

Contact Communications & Marketing for more information.

Horton family celebrates alumnus during ATSU Founder’s Day

Robert L. Horton, D.O., '41

Robert L. Horton, D.O., '41

KIRKSVILLE, Mo. –  Robert L. Horton, D.O., a 1941 graduate of the Kirksville College of Osteopathy & Surgery (KCOS), now A.T. Still University-Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (ATSU-KCOM), will always be remembered as a compassionate osteopathic physician, faithful husband, and loving father. His loved ones continue to honor his legacy with memorial gifts that can be found on ATSU’s Kirksville, Mo., campus.

Celebrating his legacy

On October 17, during ATSU’s Founder’s Day week, members of the Horton family gathered on campus to remember Dr. Horton, who died in December 1942. The reunion was a long time dream of Dr. Horton’s wife, Nellie (Horton) McCoy, age 90, a resident of Twin Pines nursing home. Her son, born in 1942, Robert L. Horton, Ph.D., travelled from Oregon and his son, Robert A. Horton, Ph.D., travelled from Wisconsin for the gathering.

While on campus, the family visited the Medicinal Garden at the Still National Osteopathic Museum to view a tree that the family donated in Dr. Horton’s memory and also spent time in Centennial Park admiring a newly engraved granite capstone dedicated in Dr. Horton’s honor.

About Dr. Horton

Dr. Horton left his home state of Ohio to follow a dream of becoming a doctor, seeking a professional career as his family before him had, dating back to the 1830s and continuing to this day through the Horton descendants. That dream brought him to medical school in Kirksville where he would meet his wife, Nellie Robertson of nearby Brashear, Mo. While attending KCOS he became a personal assistant to Charles Still, D.O., son of the college’s founder, Andrew Taylor Still, M.D., D.O.

Upon graduation from KCOS, the Horton’s made their way to Climax Springs in the Ozarks of Missouri. With no other doctor for many miles, Dr. Horton established a clinic in his home and relied on Nellie to provide nursing support. Dr. Horton planned to establish a much needed local hospital before his untimely death just one year following his graduation from medical school.

Share

Contact Communications & Marketing for more information.

« Previous PageNext Page »